Pumpkin Gnocchi with Sage Butter

  

Several weeks ago, I had some leftover pumpkin puree languishing in the refrigerator. Not being a baker inspiration was slow to come until I came across this recipe. I love pumpkin in ravioli so why not in gnocchi!

Following Steamy Kitchen’s instructions was easy with her step by step photos, but the brown butter balsamic glaze she ended with was a hot mess all over my stove. Luckily, the recipe produced lots of gnocchi, so I popped the remainder in the freezer for another day.

Today was another day.

Dropping the still frozen gnocchi into a huge pot of boiling water (as Lydia Bastianich recommended) and sizzling some fresh sage leaves in melted butter made for a delightful second attempt at pumpkin gnocchi. Savory and sweet in one delicious mouthful! A handful of gnocchi will fill you up quickly because they’re pretty heavy little dumplings (at least the pumpkin ones were). And while you may think that 3 tablespoons of butter is not much sauce for 2 servings, let go of that fear; it’s plenty.

I’ll be sending this to Theresa of Food Hunters Guide for this week’s round up of Presto Pasta Night. If you want to participate this week, send your entries to theresa (at)foodhuntersguide (dot)com and cc ruth (at) 4everykitchen (dot) com by Thursday, April 28.

Pumpkin Gnocchi with Sage Butter
(makes 50-60 gnocchi depending upon size)

1/2 cup skim milk ricotta
1/2 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup freshly grated parmegiano reggiano
1 large egg yolk
1 teaspoon lemon zest
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup all purpose flour, sifted plus more for dusting
3 tablespoons butter
20 small fresh whole sage leaves (or 10 large, chopped)
shaved parmesan for serving

Combine ricotta, pumpkin, parmesan, egg yolk, zest and salt in large bowl. Mix well. Sprinkle half of the flour on the mixture, gently turn with spatula a few times to incorporate. Add remaining flour and mix gently to incorporate. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface and kneed gently for 1 minute to bring dough together. Break dough into 4 parts and cover three parts with clean cloth. Dust work space with some flour and roll one piece into a long log, about the width of your pinky finger. Cut gnocchi into 1″ pieces and set a baking sheet lined with waxed paper. Repeat for remaining pieces of dough. If you are planning to freeze the gnocchi, place in freezer for 4-5 hours. Remove and place in zip log bags. To cook immediately, bring large pot of salted water to boil (4-8 quarts water). Add gnocchi and cook 3-4 minutes after the water returns to a boil and they have floated to the top. Meanwhile, heat butter until it melts over medium high heat. Add sage and allow to crisp but not brown. When gnocchi has finished cooking, draining well (very well) and add to sauce pan with sage butter (it will splatter if there is much water clinging to the gnocchi so be careful.) Toss with butter for 1 minute and serve. Add shaved parmesan if you like or some additional lemon zest would have hit the spot as well!

Hugs!

Recipes currently inspiring me:


Cheesy Baked Cauliflower Chowder at An Edible Mosaic
Spinach Gnocchi at Thyme for Cooking
Ginger Pasta with Sweet Potato Wasabi Sauce at Eats Well With Others

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This entry was posted in Herbs, Italian, Vegetables, Vegetarian. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Pumpkin Gnocchi with Sage Butter

  1. YUM!! Look delicious. I love gnocchi with butter sage and I can only imagine how good it tastes with pumpkin gnocchi.

  2. Ruth Daniels says:

    I couldn't agree more. I tried to make gnocchi once and it was a disaster. This one is worth another go! Thanks for sharing with Presto Pasta Nights.

  3. Nutmeg Nanny says:

    This sounds amazing! I love potato and sage…yum!

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