Zabaglione with Raspberries

As cliche as it sounds, people love the sound of the Italian language. Jamie Lee Curtis in A Fish Called Wanda, Bananarama sang, “Robert DeNiro is waiting, talking Italian,” and countless other pop culture references have women swooning over the spoken word of Italian. Well, cliches are full of truth, and the truth is I’ve always wanted to make this dessert because of its name; specifically the sound of its name.

[dzabaˈjonɛ] is the phonetic spelling, but I think of it as “zza-bag-li-own-y”. Make sense? Maybe not but trust me, this quick dessert is so easy to make it won’t matter if you know how to pronounce it or not. Of course the French also have a version they call sabayon, but I think the Italian sounds prettier! (I’m just a tad biased!)

People often add whipped cream to give it some heft, it’s thinner than it looks. But I like the unadulterated version I made here.

Zabaglione

2 egg yolks
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 cup Marsala wine
drop vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon lemon zest

Place all ingredients in a double boiler, ensuring water does not touch the bottom of the bowl. If you don’t have a double boiler, use a metal bowl that fits inside a saucepan without touching the bottom or the water in the saucepan. Bring water in pan to a low simmer and place bowl on top. Add yokes, sugar and Marsala in bowl and whisk continually over low heat until the zabaglione thickens and triples in size, about 10-15 minutes. Add vanilla and stir a few minutes more. Remove from heat and stir in lemon zest and serve immediately with fresh berries on top.

Hugs!

Recipes currently inspiring me: 

Seared Beef, Cucumber and Bean Sprout Salad at Essentially Healthy Food
Tarragon Corn at Simply Recipes
Green Goddess Dressing at Hedonia

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This entry was posted in Dessert, Eggs, Italian, Quick. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Zabaglione with Raspberries

  1. sophie says:

    oh, that looks good! Of course I'm buyest for the french name.. sabayon, doesn't that sound better? 🙂

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